Inaugural Lectures

 

PROFESSOR DR ZULQARNAIN MOHAMED - 11 AUGUST 2017
PosterBG_SP_ZULQ

Synopsis:

DNA is the blueprint of life. DNA is where life’s information is stored, read and used in our daily functions. DNA in our cells is like a series of books (genome), and in each book (chromosomes) there are chapters (genes) and spacers, and within chapters there are sections (exons) and even more spacers. Interestingly, these chapters may be read together and give one story, and sometimes different chapters may be read in different combinations to give yet different stories. This special book is written in codes, using four basic alphabets A, G, C and T. Understanding these codes along with its instructions remain the ultimate aim of most genetic and genomic studies, because these codes determine our being, how we look like, whether we are healthy or sick, and whether we can do anything about it. As we know more about DNA, we realise that there is more to gain from this knowledge than just understanding how it works. DNA can be used for individual identification in criminal studies and forensics, as well as in paternity disputes. Individual identification is not limited to human beings, but also insects and other animals where the specific identification of a species or a strain is required. We can use DNA information to instruct microorganisms to make proteins we like, or even change organisms according to our specifications. These multifaceted use of DNA information has been the impetus and reason for my neverending fascination of this molecule, and the driving force of my research endeavours.

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PROFESSOR DR ROFINA YASMIN OTHMAN - 5 MAY 2017

Poster_BG_ROFINA

Synopsis :
Viral diseases continue to be among the most elusive of pathogens impacting virtually every living organism. Despite the progress we have made in understanding the biology of viruses, humans, animals and plants continue to be adversely impacted. Research on virus diseases has benefited greatly from the advances in molecular biology, high throughput technologies and analytics that are slowly but surely making an impact on these pathogens enabling us to formulate strategies for biosecurity and biosafety. Diagnostic advances have certainly benefited from molecular information on viral pathogens enabling faster and more sensitive platforms. To develop strategies for resistance in plants, molecular approaches have enabled engineering of pathogen and plant derived defense, the use of novel proteins and more recently the use of RNAi technologies. However viruses also present to us structures that have economic value beyond their impact as disease agents. Their unique properties as delivery and expression vectors have wide potential and can contribute to new bio applications and the bioeconomy.

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PROFESSOR DR BERNARDINE RENALDO WONG CHENG KIAT - 11 MAY 2017
Poster_BG_BERNARDINE

Synopsis :
The Quantum Theory had its beginnings at the turn of the 20th century when Planck was forced to the conclusion that energy was absorbed and emitted in discrete packets. This revolutionary idea gained ground slowly until a complete theory of non-relativistic quantum mechanics was proposed, first by Heisenberg and shortly thereafter by Schrodinger, in the years 1925 – 1926. Since then, there have been rapid advances; the quantum theory was first applied to the relativistic regime by Dirac in 1928 and extended to quantum fields by many workers. The theory has been applied, with great success, to describe a diverse range of phenomena involving light, atoms, molecules, nuclei, condensed matter, sub-atomic particles and, even, information and computing. To date, the quantum theory provides the most accurate description of sub-nuclear processes. It is also crucial to the elucidation of cosmological questions such as the existence of black holes and the origin of the physical universe.  In this lecture, I will broadly explore the general ideas of the quantum theory and, at times, relate to selected topics in the study of the atomic nucleus.

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PROFESSOR DR WAN JEFREY BASIRUN - 28 APRIL 2017
Poster_wEB

Synopsis

There is a very small interface between the electrode and the electrolyte, but has a huge impact for the past two hundred years. The electrode-electrolyte interface came into prominence when electrochemist began to theorize how the electron transfers itself from the electrode phase to the electrolyte phase. Some of the most important industrial innovations which shape our lives in the modern times such as the production of certain chemicals, electroplating, sensors, battery and fuel-cells, are the results of this process. 

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PROFESSOR DR ROSLAN MD NOR - 28 APRIL 2017
Poster_BG

Synopsis

Nanomaterials are typically defined as materials with dimensions less than 100 nm. However, materials in the nanoscale are more appropriately defined as materials whose properties are significantly different from that of the bulk by virtue of their sizes.  The reduction in size resulted in significant departure to the electrical, magnetic, optical, electronics, mechanical and thermal properties of nanomaterials compared to the bulk. The new properties afforded by the size effect are of great interest to both basic science and industrial applications. In this lecture, such behaviour in carbon and oxide nanomaterials will be highlighted. The synthesis, characterization and applications of carbon nanotubes and zinc oxide nanoparticles will be discussed to demonstrate the size effect of these materials. Scientific study results on the applications at the laboratory scale as field electron emitters, organic vapor sensors, photocatalyst, adsorbent for waste water treatment and in photonics devices will be presented.  Technical challenges to industrial applications based on our study on will be highlighted within the scope of unsolved problems in the associated field.

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PROFESSOR DR ZANARIAH ABDULLAH - 25 NOVEMBER 2016
Backdrop Syarahan Perdana Prof Zanariah
Synopsis - My voyage in heterocyclic research started with simple diazines. Diazines are family of heterocyclic compounds, containing two nitrogen atoms at various positions. Examples of simple diazines are pyrimidines, with two nitrogen atoms at 1, 3 positions, pyrazines, with nitrogen atoms at 1, 4 positions and  pyridazines, nitrogen atoms at 1, 2 positions. The structural unit of pyrazine and pyrimidine, for example is found in many natural products. The pyrimidine ring system has wide occurrence in nature, either as substituted and/or ring fused compounds, for example in the nucleotides, thiamine (vitamin B1) and alloxan. It is also found in many synthetic compounds such as barbiturates and the HIV drug, zidovudine.  Pyrazine on the other hand, is also found as flavour constituents in peas, coffee, capsicum peppers and wines. Pyrazine and pyrimidine fuse with either benzene or another heterocycle to form fused-ring systems, for example purines, quinoxalines, thiadiazole, etc. Our team embarked in synthesizing fluorescent derivatives of pyrimidines, pyrazines, quinoxalines, etc., and their metal complexes. Our work continues with synthesis of biologically active systems such as derivatives of imidazolium, benzimidazolium, 1, 2, 4-triazole and 1, 3, 4-oxadiazole.

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PROFESOR DR CHRISTOPER G. JESUDASON - 6 DECEMBER 2016
SYARAHAN PERDANA PROFESOR DR CHRISTOPER G. JESUDASON
Synopsis - he lecture recounts  fundamental research outcomes  in statistical
thermodynamics, mechanics, quantum theory, thermal radiation, conductive  heat transfer,  variational principles and thermodynamics  arising  from  the process of posing scientific questions that were raised relative to  work featured in the accessible   media in terms of   critique rectification of  such  work instead of being drawn into the standard safe science  incentive  par excellence of working within the parameters of specialized collaborative   global  research groups  in  incremental advances with guaranteed visibility and media based accreditation.

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PROFESSOR DR YUSOFF MOHD AMIN - 22 AUGUST 2016
Syarahan Perdana Prof Yusoff Mohd Amin
Abstract - Radiation is energy in transit in the form of high-speed particles and electromagnetic waves.We encounter electromagnetic waves every day. They make up our visible light, radio, handphone and television waves, ultra violet (UV), and microwaves with a spectrum of energies. These examples of electromagnetic waves do not cause ionizations of atoms because they do not carry enough energy to separate molecules or remove electrons from atoms.

The term radiation is actually referred to radiation with enough energy so that during an
interaction with an atom, it can remove tightly bound electrons from their orbits, causing the atom to become charged or ionized and hence to be more precise the term ionizing radiation is sometime used. Examples are X-rays (gamma rays) and neutrons.

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