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Master of Science in Instrumental Analytical Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry is the largest department in the Faculty of Science. The department started operation in the academic year 1959/1960 and is one of the oldest departments in the faculty. One of the objectives of the department is to provide a centre of excellence in chemical education and research in Malaysia. Students from the department are trained to develop their critical, creative and innovative thinking. The department is proud to produce graduates who are highly regarded and much sought after in the work force market. At the moment, the Departmental workforce consists of 52 academic staff and 44 support staff who are involved in either technical or clerical support roles.

The Department offers three programmes, namely, the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry (B.Sc. in Chemistry), Bachelor of Science in Applied Chemistry (B.Sc. in Applied Chemistry) and Master of Science in Instrumental Analytical Chemistry (M.Sc. in Instrumental Analytical Chemistry) (formally known as Master of Science in Analytical Chemistry & Instrumental Analysis). The Department is the first institution of higher learning in Malaysia to receive the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) accreditation for all BSc and MSc programmes. Benchmarking the three offered programmes with those offered by other renowned institute of higher learning via the RSC accreditation would certainly help the Department to develop and expand its programmes in line with international quality and standards.

The Department of Chemistry also offers postgraduate programmes by research, namely, Master of Science by research, Master and Doctor of Philosophy. These programmes form the essence of our research activities. The research conducted in the Department is varied; some researchers focus on fundamental themes while others focus on various aspects of applied chemistry.


Course Structure

The aim of the Masters by Coursework in Instrumental Analytical Chemistry is to cater for the growing needs of modern day industry which require skilled personnel who are knowledgeable in the handling of a sophisticated range of analytical instruments as well as possessing the interpretative skills necessary to solve complex chemistry problems. The course is based on modern instrumental analytical chemistry and is designed to address the needs of industrial laboratories and research organizations. 

Master of Science in Instrumental Analytical Chemistry

Session 2017/2018

(42 CREDITS)

1. Program Core Courses (33 CREDITS)

Course Code

Course Name

Credits

SQC7001

Research Methodology in Analytical Chemistry

4

SQC7002

Research Project

10

SQC7003

Atomic Spectroscopic Analysis

3

SQC7004

Chromatographic Analysis

3

SQC7005

Quality Assurance in Analytical Laboratory

3

SQC7006

Molecular Spectroscopic Analysis

3

SQC7007

Mass Spectrometry and Related Techniques

3

SQC7008

Advanced Laboratory Skills I

2

SQC7009

Advanced Laboratory Skills II

2

2. Program Elective Courses (9 CREDITS)

Course Code

Course Name

Credits

SQC7010

Electroanalytical Chemistry and Biosensor

3

SQC7011

Laboratory Automation

3

SQC7012

Thermal Analysis

3

SQC7013

Chemometric

3

SQC7014

Environmental Chemical Analysis

3

SQC7015

Food Analysis

3

SQC7016

Particulate and Surface Analysis

3


SQC7001 Research Methodology in Analytical Chemistry
This course provides an overview of research methodology in the field of chemistry and the introduction of basic statistical techniques for data analysis. Topics discussed include scientific problem solving techniques and experimental planning, research ethics and laboratory safety, literature study and scientific writing, sampling plans and strategies, data treatment and analysis which involve basic statistics, hypothesis tests and regression.

Sample treatment-Introduction & general considerations on sampling techniques & sample decomposition; sources of errors in decomposition and dissolution; wet oxidation and dry oxidation methods; decomposition of samples by fluxes, microwave and ultrasonic; relative merits of each sample decomposition method; metal speciation in biological and environmental analysis.

Sample preparation for Organic Analysis – Extraction methods for solids, liquids and volatile compounds; Pre-concentration using solvent evaporation; Clean-up and coupling of different sorbents; effect of sample matrix; Advantages and drawbacks of extraction methods. Examples of case studies related to selective methods on organic and inorganic analysis.

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment 50%
Final Examination 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:
Skills in planning and conducting scientific research, including data treatment and analysis. Other transferable skills are report and proposal writing.

SQC7002 Research Project
This course exposes the candidates to a realistic setting outside of the classroom. Each candidate would carry out a research project under the supervision of a lecturer from Department of Chemistry in two semesters. The research progress are monitored and assessed by the appointed supervisor throughout the candidature period

At the end of the second semester, the candidates are required to present their research and findings in a written report and defend them in the Viva Voce session. The presentations would then be assessed by the supervisor and examiner appointed by the department.

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 100% (Report and Viva Voce assessment)

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:
Practical, getting information from ICT, operate related instrument

SQC7003 Atomic Spectroscopic Analysis
The module is designed to introduce the general aspects on atomic spectroscopy, flame and plasma atomic emission spectrometry (AES), atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS), including non-flame AAS and hydride-generation technique, atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), molecular fluorescence spectrometry (MFS) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) is a spectro-analytical procedure for the quantitative determination of chemical elements using the absorption of optical radiation (light) by free atoms in the gaseous state. Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) is a method of chemical analysis that uses the intensity of light emitted from a flame, plasma, arc, or spark at a particular wavelength to determine the quantity of an element in a sample. The wavelength of the atomic spectral line gives the identity of the element while the intensity of the emitted light is proportional to the number of atoms of the element. Fluorescence spectroscopy (also known as fluorometry or spectrofluorometry) is a type of electromagnetic spectroscopy which analyzes fluorescence from a sample. It involves using a beam of light, usually ultraviolet light, that excites the electrons in molecules of certain compounds and causes them to emit light; typically, but not necessarily, visible light. An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is a type of plasma source in which the energy is supplied by electric currents which are produced by electromagnetic induction, that is, by time-varying magnetic fields. Topics to be discussed in this module will include spectro-chemical information such as spectro-chemical measurements, optical components of spectrometers, optical sources, transducers and measurement systems, signal-to-noise ratio considerations and methodology in spectro-chemical analysis.

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:
Data interpretation

SQC7004 Chromatographic Analysis
Gas chromatography (GC) is one of the most widely used analytical techniques. GC is used to separate complex mixtures of different molecules based on their physical properties, such as polarity and boiling point. It is an ideal tool to analyze gas and liquid samples containing many hundreds or even thousands of different molecules, allowing the analyst to identify both the types of molecular species present and their concentrations. The course content includes: general principle of GC, sample injection techniques, column and column selection, theory of separation, detectors, qualitative and quantitative analysis using GC and some basic applications of GC.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a chromatographic technique used to separate a mixture of which is non-volatile. HPLC play an important and critical role in the field such as pharmaceutical and food industries. The importance of HPLC uses in pharmaceutical industries falls under the stringent regulations established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This requires all pharmaceutical companies to detect the quality of their products by using the HPLC before allowing them to sell it in the global market. The course content includes: basic theory of liquid chromatography, sample injection, major components of HPLC, mode of HPLC, mobile phase, column and column selection, theory of separation, detectors, basic troubleshooting, qualitative and quantitative analysis using HPLC.

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:
GC and HPLC data interpretation

SQC7006 Molecular Spectroscopic Analysis
This course provides an overview on the following topics:

  • Introduction to quality assurance in analytical laboratory
  • Quality Management – Introduction to quality systems; quality assurance principles; certification and accreditation
  • Technical Issues – Quality assurance/quality control tools; calibration; metrological traceability; measurement uncertainty; method validation; inter-laboratory studies and reference materials

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:-

SQC7006 Molecular Spectroscopic Analysis
This course provides an overview on the following topics:

Basic optical theory; Optical methods of analysis, Absorption and emission spectra; ultra-violet/visible spectroscopy (basic theory, instrumentation, interpretation of spectra and application); Infrared spectroscopy including NIR (Basic theory, instrumentation, FT-Infrared spectroscopy; interpretation of spectra and applications, quantitative infrared analysis, sampling techniques, reflectance techniques); Raman spectroscopy (Raman effect, instrumentation and applications).

General introduction to the theory of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy which includes chemical shift, spin-spin coupling, spin relaxation, NMR hardware, 1H and 13C NMR and other multinuclear species.  Aspects of application including spectra analysis (1D and 2D NMR data, structure elucidation), paramagnetic behaviour, and low temperature NMR.

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:
Data interpretation

SQC7007 Mass Spectrometry and Related Techniques
This course provides an overview on the following topics:

  • Introduction of mass spectrometry including the concept and some important terminology used in mass spectrometry, and application.
  • Basic Instrumentation of mass spectrometer including types of analyser and ion detectors.
  • Advance mass spectrometry: MS/MS - Concept and definitions, ion dissociation, instrumentation and analyte identification.
  • Principle of Ionization modes (EI, CI, ESI, and MALDI) and data interpretation.
  • Instrumentation Interfaces in mass spectrometry, including GC-MS and LC-MS.
  • Data interpretation

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:
Interpret MS data

SQC7008 Advanced Laboratory Skills I
SQC7009 Advanced Laboratory Skills II

SQC7008 and SQC7009 practical courses consist of a number of mini projects covering different aspects of the subject. The emphasis is to provide training in the analytical approach for the total analysis of samples of very different natures. It is hoped that students would gain valuable experience in a variety of both common and specialized techniques in following certain appropriate procedures in solving certain analytical problems of current interest.

Students are advised to choose any two projects (from two different groups) and should plan to complete each project in about 20 hours. Once you have made the choice, students are required to look up for relevant literature, plan your experimental work and discuss the findings with the lecturer-in-charge of the class before proceeding any further.

General Information
Advanced laboratory skill is laboratory work where students are required to carry out experiments in laboratory. Grade will be given based on laboratory performance and the laboratory report. Students who enrol in this programme are required to register both of these courses. SQC7008 and SQC7009 will be offered in Semester I and Semester II, respectively. Laboratory session will be held on every Friday, 10 am to 5 pm. Each student is required to attend 42 hours (equivalent to 7 days) of laboratory session. Laboratory session is divided in to two cycles. First cycle will be held on Week-1 to Week-7 and the Second cycle will be held on Week-8 to Week-14.

Assessment Methods:
Laboratory skill and report (100%)

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:
Report writing, Practical

SQC7010 Electroanalytical Chemistry and Biosensor
Part 1 (Electroanalytical Chemistry)

  • Review of basic concepts in electrochemical analysis; Equilibrium (static methods) - potentiometry, pH, reference electrodes, liquid junction potentials, ion selective electrodes, potentiometric titrations.
  • Dynamic methods - sweep and pulse techniques, hydrodynamic and differential techniques.

 Part 2 (Biosensors)

  • Basics of biosensors and nanotechnological approaches to biosensor development.
  • Basics of Biosensors - What is a biosensor, steps involved in making a biosensor, the sorts of biomolecules used in biosensors; methods of immobilizing biomolecules; approaches to transduction and classes of biosensors.
  • Catalytic Biosensors - Two models on enzyme electrodes: First model: immobilizing the enzyme in a polymer layer; The second model: enzyme biosensors using self-assembled monolayers.
  • Affinity Biosensors - such as DNA and antibodies.

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:-

SQC7011 Laboratory Automation
This course provides an overview on the concepts of laboratory automation from the aspects of financial justification; project management; laboratory process flow and the use of technologies to increase efficiency and effectiveness of laboratory operations; Introduction to the aspects of data acquisition; the technologies involved in data acquisition and laboratory informatics. This course exposes students to the various aspects of lab automation endeavours. These include: 

  • Introduction to laboratory automation
  • Managing a lab automation project
  • Process flow in laboratory automation and its optimization
  • The concept of lab unit operation and robotics in lab automation
  • Data acquisition, networking and AIDC (Automatic Identification and Data Capture)
  • Laboratory information management system
  • Instrument interfacing data systems

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:-

SQC7012 Thermal Analysis
Thermal analysis (TA) describes the analytical experimental techniques which investigate the behaviours (such as weight, length, modulus, heat flow, temperature, enthalpy, dimension etc.) of a sample as a function of temperature. TA techniques can investigate both the physical phenomena (such as the changes in crystallographic properties, melting, sublimation, adsorption etc.) and chemical phenomena (such as dehydration, decomposition, oxidation, reduction etc.) of a material. In general, TA techniques (such as Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Thermal Gravimetric Analysis, Differential Thermal Analysis, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis and etc.) are used for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of macromolecules and inorganic compounds. Students will be exposed to the theories, instrumentation, operations and applications of some TA techniques. Applications of these techniques in conjunction with other methods of analysis will also be discussed.

Specific topics on the transitions and relaxations of amorphous and crystalline materials, particularly polymers, will be included. Students will develop skills in monitoring the instrumental parameters and data analysis through the presentation of some specific case study. The knowledge gained from this course will be beneficial for the students when TA becomes a part of their job in real life.

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:-

SQC7013 Chemometric
Chemometrics is the use of mathematical and statistical methods to improve the understanding of chemical information and to correlate quality parameters or physical properties to analytical instrument data. This course provides a practical guide to solving scientific problems using chemometric tools. Topics discussed are organized in three main parts:

Part I – Design of experiments
Part II – Pattern Recognition
Part III – Calibration
including concepts and key applications.

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:
Chemometric and statistical skills in data processing and analysis

SQC7014 Environmental Chemical Analysis
Interest in the environment continues to expand and develop. It is now very much part of our everyday lives. As a consequence, the need for chemical analysis of the environment continues to grow. This course gives an overview on the following topics:

  • Environment and pollution, and the Transport of pollutants in the environment and approaches to their analysis
  • Water analysis - Major parameters (pH, electrical conductivity, TOC, BOD, COD, DO, turbidity, total solid, alkalinity, hardness and etc)
  • Trace pollutants (radionuclide, organic and inorganic)
  • Analysis of land, solids and waste (common problem areas and considerations for analysis in sediments, soils, sewage sludge, plant and animal specimens)
  • Atmospheric analysis (Gases and particulates)

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:-

SQC7015 Food Analysis
This module would cover the main analytical techniques used in the food industry for the analysis of a range of food parameters. It would explore the analysis of fat soluble and water soluble vitamins, dietary fibers in food components, pesticide residues in food products, trace minerals in natural and processed foods, food additives and preservatives, micronutrients in the food chain, food contaminants, and food flavours using the various techniques described in the basic package. HACCP procedure would also be introduced for food safety evaluation programme by the food manufacturers. Evaluation of techniques by comparison with alternative methods would be presented to illustrate the limitations of the techniques and their fields of application.

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:-


SQC7016 Particulate and Surface Analysis
The course aims to provide students a good understanding into colloidal domains, surface interfaces and analyzing properties of such systems. Students will be guided through introductory topics on particle dispersions, types of colloidal systems, and their applications. Others such as factors affecting particle suspension such as electrolytes, pH, hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity will also be included. Colloidal forces and dispersed phase properties such as concentration, size and surface properties such as surface charge and potential are crucial factor affecting the particulate systems. This course also explores topics typically relevance to industrial chemists and engineers working in areas such as coating, paints, textile, pigments, cements, pharmaceutical, foods, latex/emulsions industries. The students will also learn a range of techniques for characterization of these systems. 

Topics will be taught in the course are as follow:

  • Dispersion properties — Introduction to particles and colloidal suspension. colloidal stability, flow properties, viscosity and viscoelasticity, colloidal or surface forces such as AFM and SFA.
  • Surface Properties — Wettability (contact angle goniometer), surface and interfacial tension/energy (tensiometer).
  • Particulate properties Surface area (gas adsorption and BET), particle size distribution and shape (Laser light scattering), surface charges and surface potential, (Electrophoretic mobility, electroacoustic). 

Assessment Methods:
Continuous Assessment: 50%
Final Examination: 50%

Medium of Instruction:
English

Transferable Skills:-

Language Requirement

For international students, candidates are required to have TOEFL results at least 550 or IELTS at least Band 5.5.

 

Entry Requirement

Applicants must have a Bachelor's Degree with Honors CGPA 3.0 and above or equivalent in the relevant field.

Applicants with a Bachelor's Degree of CGPA 2.7 to 2.99 may be considered if they meet at least one of the following criteria:

A. Having relevant work experience; or

B. Produce publications in related fields; or

C. is a recipient of a scholarship; or

D. is a graduate of the University of Malaya; or

E. is a government servants

Applicants with a Bachelor's Degree of CGPA 2.5 to 2.69 may be considered if they meet at least two of the criteria in (1) (A) to (E) above
Fees
Kindly refer at Fess Structure 
Last Update: November 20, 2017

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